What is Attachment?

Attachment theory focuses on how people form relationships with others.  Attachment is the emotional bond you feel for someone, so the reason you miss them if you haven’t seen them for a while.  It starts during infancy – being close to others is a basic need – you become attached to the person who caresContinue reading “What is Attachment?”

Repost: Signs Your Child Might Be Struggling With Depression

I recently wrote a blog post for Trigger publishing – they’re developing a mental health hub full of useful articles. They asked me to write about children’s mental health for Children’s Mental Health Week. Specifically something about the signs of depression in children. It’s not a straightfoward topic – no two children are the sameContinue reading “Repost: Signs Your Child Might Be Struggling With Depression”

Food for (positive) thought

So… I’m not great at eating fruit. I buy it and watch everyone else eat it. I think it’s a great idea in theory but in practice I never quite find I’m in the mood. Apples annoy me. Don’t ask me why, but they do. Luckily my partner has instilled a great love of fruit,Continue reading “Food for (positive) thought”

The Power of Routine

Clinical psychologist Dr Sonya Tsancheva writes about the importance of routine for children. Children thrive on playing games, exploring their environment and sharing their world with their peers. Alas, not so during the pandemic. More worryingly, the message “stay apart to keep safe” is too quickly becoming the norm. This can have devastating effects onContinue reading “The Power of Routine”

Child mental health problems have increased by almost 50% since 2017

A survey conducted by NHS Digital to explore child mental health found the rates of children who are experiencing a probable mental disorder had increased by almost half since 2017. It used to be one in nine (10.8%) but by July this year it was one in six (16%). The increase was fastest amongst primaryContinue reading “Child mental health problems have increased by almost 50% since 2017”

Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire – what does it mean?

One of the most common screening questionnaires for children’s mental health is the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). It’s used in research studies, clinical assessments, as well as schools to help inform Personal Education Plans. The SDQ has five subscales: emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention, peer relationships and prosocial behaviour. There is also an impactContinue reading “Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire – what does it mean?”

Mental Health in Schools

It’s slightly overwhelming to think that about 10% of children or adolescents have some sort of mental health issue. And mental health isn’t just a personal problem; it affects families, communities and society in general. In school terms, that’s roughly three pupils in every classroom, and I’m sure many teachers know only too well howContinue reading “Mental Health in Schools”

Children’s Mental Health During Coronavirus

The following is something I wrote for Shaw Mind in June. I work as a mental health researcher. That means one of my favourite things to do is look stuff up on the internet. And the pandemic has given me plenty of things to look up: signs, symptoms, restrictions, rules, not to mention an arrayContinue reading “Children’s Mental Health During Coronavirus”